Results tagged “rfi” from Just Another Hacker

Most of us think game over when we see a url that cointains a file reference, like http://localhost/basename.php?file=hello.php. Lets say that you were doing a penetration test where you are trying not to trigger any IDS alerts. How can you determine if the script filters the page variable using basename? Here are some simple steps that should go undetected.

Lets say that the scripts in this fictional url are as follows:
[basename.php]
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
        <title>Basename poc file</title>
</head>
<body>
<?php
if (file_exists(basename($_GET['file']))) {
        include(basename($_GET['file']));
} else {
        echo "404 - File not found";
}
?>
</body>
</html>
[hello.php]
<?php echo "Hello World\n"; ?>
The first test we take is to determine what a negative response would be, we'll visit http://localhost/basename.php?file=hello.wisconsin, this nets us a custom 404 error. Now that we have a false contition the next test is simply http://localhost/basename.php?file=a/b/c/hello.php. If this gives us the same output as http://localhost/basename.php?file=hello.php the script is using basename (or a similar technique) to extrace the filename. If you get a negative response the script appears to be vulnerable to directory traversal/LFI/RFI. Better encode your next attack to avoid triggering the IDS.

Happy hacking!
(And yes, this is the February tutorial running late).
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